So, what is an Urban Internet of Things?

by Terry Norman

When it comes to defining an Urban Internet of Things, believing it is simply a system where everyday objects or things with embedded sensors use telecommunications channels to connect to a city Intranet or to the Internet is a common misunderstanding. If pressed, commentators might add that the sensors communicate information about the thing which can be acted upon by a central control, often illustrating this with a smart parking or smart waste management system. This description of an urban Internet of Things is both simplistic and erroneous and more accurately describes Machine to Machine (we shall discuss what we mean by Machine to Machine or M2M shortly). However, under the right circumstances, such an M2M system might be considered an enabler of an urban Internet of Things. Understanding the difference between M2M and urban IoT will lead us to understanding what it is that characterises an urban Internet of Things.

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Optimising for video - a strategy for market growth

by Terry Norman

We believe operators should see traffic growth, particularly the growth in video traffic, as an opportunity to take a technology lead by implementing capacity management ahead of the competition. We believe a service-based pricing and optimisation approach lays the foundation for delivering to the operator long-term growth in market share. 

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The Threat of OTT – What are operators doing about it; what can they do about it?

by Terry Norman

Let’s begin this blog by making the comment that OTT players are a new breed of service provider and they are threatening operator revenues.  Many leading commentators are talking about OTT revenue of about one third of current mobile operator revenues in a few years. Now whether that is revenue taken from the mobile operator or revenue created by the OTT provider is not important (probably it’s a mix of the two). What is important is that this is a substantial sum of money which makes the OTT phenomena and the threat to mobile operators worthy of investigation.

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Churn is increasing at great cost to the mobile operator

by Terry Norman

We estimate that in developed markets amongst post-paid customers churn (moving from an operator to a competitor) is between 3 and 5%. In some markets however this can be as high as 25%. Churn costs the mobile operator in lost revenue and additional marketing, necessary to maintain market share. The cost of churn can be as much as USD 250 per churn.

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